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Archive for the 'Digital Life' Category

Your Options for Storing and Sharing Documents Online at IU

Illustration of cloud computing.

As a member of the IU community, you have some great options for online document storage, sharing, and collaboration. This post will give you an overview of Box at IU, Google at IU, and Office 356. Visit the IU Knowledge Base (KB) to see a full comparison chart for the three services.

Box at IU

With Box at IU, you can collaborate with people at IU and elsewhere on documents, spreadsheets, presentations, and more. Storage on Box at IU is unlimited, the maximum file size is 15 GB, and you can upload any file type. This service is a best for general purpose file storage and sharing.

Box at IU is acceptable for storing data classified as Restricted. This type of data may not be accessed without specific authorization. Two examples of Restricted data are a student’s grades and the home address of an employee. Learn about the different types of institutional data on this page.

With Box, you can edit Microsoft Office documents in your browser using Office Online, or open documents with your desktop Office applications. Box for Office Online automatically saves files as you work, and each auto-save creates a new version.  Box retains the 100 most recent versions of your Office documents.

Google at IU

 

Google at IU is similar to Box at IU. Storage is unlimited, and you can share and collaborate with both IU and non-IU colleagues. The maximum files size is 5 TB, and Restricted data is permitted here.  With this service, you’ll use Google Docs, Google Sheets, and other Google applications. Your file storage is on Google Drive. Google also offers version control for your documents.

Groupspaces is a useful feature that might make Google at IU the preferred choice for those involved in projects, committee work, organizations, and group activities. With Groupspaces, you get template consisting of a Group, a Calendar, and a Site. Watch this IT Training webinar to find out to get started with Groupspaces. Check out this post for more info on Google at IU.

Office 365

Office 365 is similar to the other services, but it offers only 1 TB of storage and a maximum file size of 10 GB. University-Internal data is permissible on this service. This data may be accessed by eligible employees and designated appointees of the university for purposes of university business. This type of data is a level below the Restricted category.

There are a few downsides to Office 365 including:

  • You cannot transfer ownership of files to another person.
  • There is no commenting feature for files and folders.
  • It doesn’t allow group accounts.

About Accessibility

If you’re concerned about accessibility, be aware that Google at IU and Office 365 may not offer the best experience for people with disabilities. Box, on the other hand, offers an accessible interface (https://a.box.com) that might be easier to use, but it only provides a subset of service’s features.  Keep your audience in mind when choosing a collaboration tool.

Making a Choice

In the end, the tool you use is a matter of personal preference, so be sure to check the comparison chart in the KB. You will likely end up using more than one of these services during your time at IU.

What is IU DeviceNet?

Illustration of media device and remote control.

By now you’ve probably figured out how to connect your smartphone or tablet to the IU Secure wireless network. But what about your gaming console, Roku, or Apple TV? Those devices are not designed to connect to an enterprise network like the one at IU. That’s why UITS created the IU DeviceNet. IU DeviceNet is a wireless network just for media devices and gaming consoles in campus apartments and residence halls. Here’s what you need to know about it.

Appropriate Use

Use DeviceNet for devices that don’t support WPA2/Enterprise encryption, or don’t have a web browser. Some examples are:

  • Gaming systems such as Xbox, PlayStation, Wii, and Wii U
  • Smart TV, DVR, or set-top boxes such as Apple TV, Roku, TiVo, and DVD players
  • Other media devices that require Internet access

Inappropriate Use

IU DeviceNet is an unencrypted network. It won’t ask for your username and passphrase when you connect. Without encryption, any data passed between your device and the wireless access point could be intercepted by others. That’s why you should not connect the following types of devices to this network:

  • Laptop and desktop computers
  • Mobile devices (e.g., smartphones, iPads, and tablets)
  • Any computing device you use to send and receive personal or confidential data
  • Any device that can connect to IU Secure

Incompatible Devices

Some devices and services can’t connect to IU DeviceNet because network routers have access point (AP) isolation enabled. These include Chromecast, Apple Bonjour services, and wireless printers.

Making Purchases

On IU DeviceNet, exercise caution when online stores.  Don’t make transactions using credit card numbers or account passwords over DeviceNet unless you are using a connection encrypted by SSL/TLS or some other web security protocol.

Not sure how to get connected? Follow these instructions. If you need help, contact the UITS Support Center.

Use Twitter as a Learning Tool

Twitter logo

Depending on how you use it, Twitter can be an incredible time-waster or a useful resource.  Because you’re reading this blog, I assume you’re interested in learning about technology. Why not use Twitter as a tool to further your learning?

In this post, you’ll find a curated list of Twitter accounts that regularly share links to technology news, tips, tricks, and tutorials. Once you’ve chosen some accounts to follow, it’s a good idea to create Twitter lists so you can easily find the type of information that you need. Here are a few tweeters organized by category.  Read the rest of “Use Twitter as a Learning Tool” »

Some of Our Favorite Technology Podcasts

Podcasts are great for entertainment and learning.

Podcast icon. Headphones over wi-fi symbol.You can listen while driving, biking, exercising, cleaning – really, anytime! If you’re looking for engaging podcasts about technology, check out the list I’ve put together. Topics range from general tech questions to advice about coding, and insights about the role of technology in society. These podcasts make it easy for you to keep up with the ever-changing world of tech. Read the rest of “Some of Our Favorite Technology Podcasts” »

Preserving your Digital Life

Illustration: DVD with snapshots and file type icons.

Preserve your digital life.

When I sat down to write about personal digital preservation I wasn’t sure where to start. I looked for a statistic telling how much data the average person produces each day, but I couldn’t find the exact answer to that question. I found an infographic from 2012 showing how much data is generated in one minute. It’s a crazy amount!

For example, every minute in 2012:

  • We were uploading 48 hours of YouTube videos.
  • We sent 100,00 tweets.
  • We shared over 680,000 pieces of content on Facebook.

See the infographic for the other numbers. If you like that kind of thing, you should visit the Internet Live Stats site.

The bottom line is that we are producing a lot of digital artifacts. I think of an artifact as something a human being produces that expresses some aspect of their humanity. If you think your digital creations are important, you’ll want to be able to see or hear them in the years to come.

Read the rest of “Preserving your Digital Life” »

Detox Your Online Life

Title image of a girl on a hammock using a computer under a magnolia tree

I live online! And I wouldn’t want it any other way. But sometimes it’s good to just step back and figure out what you really need in your life and what is just filling up your inbox and cluttering your bookmarks bar. About once a every three months I try to plan a media clean up. Think of it like a quarterly cleaning list just like you have for your house. I dust up the cluttered folders in my inbox, I run the sweeper over my overly crowded bookmarks bar, and I reorganize all of my social sites and dashboard tasks. Read the rest of “Detox Your Online Life” »

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