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Your Options for Storing and Sharing Documents Online at IU

Illustration of cloud computing.

As a member of the IU community, you have some great options for online document storage, sharing, and collaboration. This post will give you an overview of Box at IU, Google at IU, and Office 356. Visit the IU Knowledge Base (KB) to see a full comparison chart for the three services.

Box at IU

With Box at IU, you can collaborate with people at IU and elsewhere on documents, spreadsheets, presentations, and more. Storage on Box at IU is unlimited, the maximum file size is 15 GB, and you can upload any file type. This service is a best for general purpose file storage and sharing.

Box at IU is acceptable for storing data classified as Restricted. This type of data may not be accessed without specific authorization. Two examples of Restricted data are a student’s grades and the home address of an employee. Learn about the different types of institutional data on this page.

With Box, you can edit Microsoft Office documents in your browser using Office Online, or open documents with your desktop Office applications. Box for Office Online automatically saves files as you work, and each auto-save creates a new version.  Box retains the 100 most recent versions of your Office documents.

Google at IU

 

Google at IU is similar to Box at IU. Storage is unlimited, and you can share and collaborate with both IU and non-IU colleagues. The maximum files size is 5 TB, and Restricted data is permitted here.  With this service, you’ll use Google Docs, Google Sheets, and other Google applications. Your file storage is on Google Drive. Google also offers version control for your documents.

Groupspaces is a useful feature that might make Google at IU the preferred choice for those involved in projects, committee work, organizations, and group activities. With Groupspaces, you get template consisting of a Group, a Calendar, and a Site. Watch this IT Training webinar to find out to get started with Groupspaces. Check out this post for more info on Google at IU.

Office 365

Office 365 is similar to the other services, but it offers only 1 TB of storage and a maximum file size of 10 GB. University-Internal data is permissible on this service. This data may be accessed by eligible employees and designated appointees of the university for purposes of university business. This type of data is a level below the Restricted category.

There are a few downsides to Office 365 including:

  • You cannot transfer ownership of files to another person.
  • There is no commenting feature for files and folders.
  • It doesn’t allow group accounts.

About Accessibility

If you’re concerned about accessibility, be aware that Google at IU and Office 365 may not offer the best experience for people with disabilities. Box, on the other hand, offers an accessible interface (https://a.box.com) that might be easier to use, but it only provides a subset of service’s features.  Keep your audience in mind when choosing a collaboration tool.

Making a Choice

In the end, the tool you use is a matter of personal preference, so be sure to check the comparison chart in the KB. You will likely end up using more than one of these services during your time at IU.

Google at IU

The Google at IU homepage.

Google at IU homepage.

IU students, faculty, and staff have access to yet another online collaboration tool. It’s Google at IU! You might wonder why you should use Google at IU instead of Box.iu for collaboration and storage. Frankly, it’s a matter of personal preference. You’ll find that both services have their pros and cons, so I suggest experimenting to see what works for you.

Understanding your Google at IU account

If you have a personal Google account things can get a little bit confusing once you set up your Google at IU account. First, make sure that your personal Google account and your Google at IU account are separate. Any institutional data you have should be stored in the IU account and not your personal account. Read about institutional data in this IU Knowledge Base (KB) document, and get tips on managing the separate accounts from this KB doc.

To access Google at IU, log in to google.iu.edu and authenticate with your IU username and passphrase. You can also log directly into Google from your browser or mobile app with your username@iu.edu email address. From there, you’ll be directed to the CAS login page. Note that this address is different from your @iub, @iupui, @iuk, etc. email.

Now that you’re logged in, let’s talk about the apps you can use. Read the rest of “Google at IU” »

Mobile apps to use at IU

Illustration of hand using touch screen to access app icons.

The best way (as a rule) to interact with an online service on your smartphone or tablet is to use an app designed specifically for that service. University Information Technology Services (UITS) has some app recommendations to help you get the best experience when accessing IU systems. Here’s the rundown.

  • As of February 2, 2017, CAS logins for all IU faculty, staff, student employees, retirees, and affiliates require Two-Step Login (Duo). This means you’ll use the Duo Mobile app to access IU systems. Watch this video to see how the app works.
  • I’ll include  Adobe Connect Mobile in this post because IU still uses Connect for conferencing and collaboration. However, the service goes away on August 31, 2017.  Learn about the replacement for Adobe Connect in the next section.
  • Zoom is IU’s new collaboration tool, and IT Training has already adopted it to deliver webinars and online workshops. Zoom’s mobile app is available for iOS and Android. Use it to attend our webinars, but stick to the desktop app for interactive workshops. For best results, enter the event URL in your device’s web browser. You’ll be redirected to the Zoom app where you’ll join the webinar. Learn all about using Zoom in this IT Training webinar.
  • IU’s Unicom service is another option for communicating and collaborating. Read this KB doc to learn how to use Skype for Business/Lync on your mobile device.
  • Access your IU Box files and folders from a mobile device with the Box app. There’s an app for iOS, Android, Windows, and Blackberry. Log in using the Single Sign-on (SSO) option and your IU email address. You’ll be sent to the CAS authentication page.  There’s more about logging in to the app in this IU Knowledge Base (KB) document. You can also access the Box mobile site (box.iu.edu) with your device’s browser, but it offers limited functionality.
  • Canvas in a browser on your device is okay, but the interface can get a little unwieldy. The Canvas mobile app shows a simpler, more manageable view. Some Canvas features are not available in the app. Check this list to see what’s supported in the different operating systems.
  • Google at IU offers a variety of productivity and collaboration tools for use by IU students, faculty, and staff. The service’s mobile apps for Android and iOS include Google Drive, Google Docs, Sheets and Slides, Google Calendar, and more. Find out how to access your Google at IU account from this KB doc.
  • Looking to access IUanyWare while on the go? Download the Citrix Receiver and follow the instructions in the KB for getting connected. You can use IUanyWare with iOS, Android, Blackberry, Windows, and Chrome devices. Learn more about IUanyWare in this KB doc.
  • One.IU is your portal to all things IU. It’s optimized for use in your mobile device’s browser. iOS users can also access One.IU via the IU Mobile app.
  • If you’re on the Bloomington campus at night and don’t feel safe walking home, use the TapRide app to contact the Safety Escort service. Safety Escort is an IU-sponsored organization staffed entirely by IU students. The app is available for iOS and Android devices. You can also call 812-855-SAFE to arrange a pickup.

Be sure to check out Using your mobile device at IU for more tips on getting around online with your smartphone or tablet.

Got a favorite app? Comment and tell us about it.

 

What is IU DeviceNet?

Illustration of media device and remote control.

By now you’ve probably figured out how to connect your smartphone or tablet to the IU Secure wireless network. But what about your gaming console, Roku, or Apple TV? Those devices are not designed to connect to an enterprise network like the one at IU. That’s why UITS created the IU DeviceNet. IU DeviceNet is a wireless network just for media devices and gaming consoles in campus apartments and residence halls. Here’s what you need to know about it.

Appropriate Use

Use DeviceNet for devices that don’t support WPA2/Enterprise encryption, or don’t have a web browser. Some examples are:

  • Gaming systems such as Xbox, PlayStation, Wii, and Wii U
  • Smart TV, DVR, or set-top boxes such as Apple TV, Roku, TiVo, and DVD players
  • Other media devices that require Internet access

Inappropriate Use

IU DeviceNet is an unencrypted network. It won’t ask for your username and passphrase when you connect. Without encryption, any data passed between your device and the wireless access point could be intercepted by others. That’s why you should not connect the following types of devices to this network:

  • Laptop and desktop computers
  • Mobile devices (e.g., smartphones, iPads, and tablets)
  • Any computing device you use to send and receive personal or confidential data
  • Any device that can connect to IU Secure

Incompatible Devices

Some devices and services can’t connect to IU DeviceNet because network routers have access point (AP) isolation enabled. These include Chromecast, Apple Bonjour services, and wireless printers.

Making Purchases

On IU DeviceNet, exercise caution when online stores.  Don’t make transactions using credit card numbers or account passwords over DeviceNet unless you are using a connection encrypted by SSL/TLS or some other web security protocol.

Not sure how to get connected? Follow these instructions. If you need help, contact the UITS Support Center.

Making Annotations in Box Notes

box-icon

Box at IU is more than just a simple, secure way to store your files online. With Box, you can share files and folders and collaborate with classmates and colleagues. One useful tool for collaboration is the Box Note. Box Notes are easy to create, edit, and share, plus they have tools you can use to annotate note content.

When you highlight text in a note you have the option to strike through the text, add a note about the text, or make the text a clickable hyperlink. The people you’ve shared the note with can see your annotations and make their own. It’s a great way to communicate about the work you’re doing. The video below shows you how to complete each of these tasks.

Be sure to check out these other IT Training Tips Blog posts about Box at IU.

 

 

Software at IU – a quick overview

One of the perks of being an IU student, faculty, or staff member is having access to low-cost and no-cost software. This quick post will give you a rundown of what’s available.

IUware

Let’s start with IUware. Go to the IUware website to download software to your computer. The site will detect what operating system you’re using and take you to the appropriate page. Software is available for PC, Mac, and Linux. Browse software titles by category or use the search box to find what you need. When you’ve found your software, follow the download instructions. You’ll be prompted to enter your IU username and passphrase if you’re not already logged into the Central Authentication System (CAS). Some software requires a product key. You can find keys to products you’ve downloaded by clicking the Keys and Licenses link at the top of the page.

Read the rest of “Software at IU – a quick overview” »

8 Tutorials on Making Selections in Photoshop

Peacock being selected in Photoshop.

Making selections is a skill that all would-be Photoshop experts must master. It’s also something that can be accomplished using many different tools and techniques. This post points you to some tutorials illustrating various ways to make selections in Photoshop. The tool or set of tools you use to make selections depends on the image you’re working with and what you want to accomplish. You can really open up creative avenues by being adept at lots of different selection techniques.  And remember, to get good at anything, you have to practice!

Read the rest of “8 Tutorials on Making Selections in Photoshop” »

IT Training Certificate Series–Updated

Illustration of certificate ribbon.

Earning a certificate from IT Training is a great way to enhance your skills in areas like Microsoft Office, web development, and creating graphics.   Office 2016 is here, so we’ve updated some of the series workshops (note major changes to the Access series). The process is the same. You take a series of related IT Training workshops designed to build your skills in applications or topics in a comprehensive way! After you’ve attended all of the workshops in a series (within a one-year period), you’ll earn your certificate.

We offer certificates in five different areas, so you’re bound to find something to meet your needs.

Office 2016 Productivity (6 workshops)

We’ll introduce you to a variety of Microsoft Office applications and demonstrate ways make them work together. You’ll learn the basic skills for day-to-day office activities from creating a spreadsheet in Excel to creating a PowerPoint presentation. The required workshops are:

1. Outlook 2016: Managing Your Email
2. Outlook 2016: Calendar Essentials
3. Word 2016: The Basics
4. PowerPoint 2016: The Basics
5. Excel 2016: The Basics
6. Access 2016: The Basics

Read the rest of “IT Training Certificate Series–Updated” »

Use Twitter as a Learning Tool

Twitter logo

Depending on how you use it, Twitter can be an incredible time-waster or a useful resource.  Because you’re reading this blog, I assume you’re interested in learning about technology. Why not use Twitter as a tool to further your learning?

In this post, you’ll find a curated list of Twitter accounts that regularly share links to technology news, tips, tricks, and tutorials. Once you’ve chosen some accounts to follow, it’s a good idea to create Twitter lists so you can easily find the type of information that you need. Here are a few tweeters organized by category.  Read the rest of “Use Twitter as a Learning Tool” »

Some Quick Facts about IT Training at IU

FAQ

What is IT Training at IU? Maybe you’ve heard of us, but do you really know what we’re all about? This post answers our most frequently asked questions.

Who can attend IT Training workshops and events?

IU students, faculty, and staff can attend IT Training workshops at no cost. Faculty and staff with official retiree status may also attend free of charge. Non-IU participants can register for workshops for a nominal fee. If you’re not affiliated with IU, you must create a guest account before registering for a workshop. Paying participants receive a 10% discount when registering for all workshops in a Certificate Series at once.

What are my training options?

We offer instructor-led workshops on more than 80 beginning to advanced computing and information technology topics. You can attend in-person at IU Bloomington or IUPUI, or online anywhere you have an Internet connection. If you prefer to learn on your own, you can download our workshop materials or watch webinar and tutorial recordings. You can also take advantage of IU’s partnerships with Pluralsight, Skillsoft, and Microsoft eLearning. Find the complete list of training options here.

Can I earn a certificate from IT Training?

IT Training offers several certificate and certification options including the IT Training Certificate Series. Earning a certificate shows your boss or potential employer that you have taken steps to bolster your technology skills. Enrolling in a certificate series also helps you learn a topic in a comprehensive way.

How do I register for a workshop or Certificate Series?

You can register online for individual workshops, register online for a Certificate Series, or contact us so we can register you for the workshop or series you want.

What can I expect in an IT Training workshop?

In-person workshops happen in our IUB or IUPUI classrooms and range from 50 minutes to three hours long.  As a participant, you’ll be provided with step-by-step materials and a computer. You’ll perform tasks as the instructor demonstrates. If you need help, raise your hand, and the classroom assistant will come and work with you. Don’t hesitate to ask questions! Online workshops operate on the same model. See the Preparing for IT Training online events page for hardware and software requirements and instructions.

What is the difference between an online workshop and webinar?

You’ll use your web browser to participate in both types of presentations, but there are differences. In online workshops, participants complete hands-on exercises. Webinars are usually shorter than workshops and feature demonstration and lecture only. You can ask questions and make comments in both types of presentations.

What accommodation does IT Training provide for those with accessibility issues?

All of our classrooms are accessible to persons using wheelchairs, and we can provide assistance for those with disabilities. Advance notice is important, so contact us if you have a need.

Those are just some of the things you need to know about IT Training. Comment on this post if you have a question that wasn’t addressed here.

 

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