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What is IU DeviceNet?

Illustration of media device and remote control.

By now you’ve probably figured out how to connect your smartphone or tablet to the IU Secure wireless network. But what about your gaming console, Roku, or Apple TV? Those devices are not designed to connect to an enterprise network like the one at IU. That’s why UITS created the IU DeviceNet. IU DeviceNet is a wireless network just for media devices and gaming consoles in campus apartments and residence halls. Here’s what you need to know about it.

Appropriate Use

Use DeviceNet for devices that don’t support WPA2/Enterprise encryption, or don’t have a web browser. Some examples are:

  • Gaming systems such as Xbox, PlayStation, Wii, and Wii U
  • Smart TV, DVR, or set-top boxes such as Apple TV, Roku, TiVo, and DVD players
  • Other media devices that require Internet access

Inappropriate Use

IU DeviceNet is an unencrypted network. It won’t ask for your username and passphrase when you connect. Without encryption, any data passed between your device and the wireless access point could be intercepted by others. That’s why you should not connect the following types of devices to this network:

  • Laptop and desktop computers
  • Mobile devices (e.g., smartphones, iPads, and tablets)
  • Any computing device you use to send and receive personal or confidential data
  • Any device that can connect to IU Secure

Incompatible Devices

Some devices and services can’t connect to IU DeviceNet because network routers have access point (AP) isolation enabled. These include Chromecast, Apple Bonjour services, and wireless printers.

Making Purchases

On IU DeviceNet, exercise caution when online stores.  Don’t make transactions using credit card numbers or account passwords over DeviceNet unless you are using a connection encrypted by SSL/TLS or some other web security protocol.

Not sure how to get connected? Follow these instructions. If you need help, contact the UITS Support Center.

Making Annotations in Box Notes

box-icon

Box at IU is more than just a simple, secure way to store your files online. With Box, you can share files and folders and collaborate with classmates and colleagues. One useful tool for collaboration is the Box Note. Box Notes are easy to create, edit, and share, plus they have tools you can use to annotate note content.

When you highlight text in a note you have the option to strike through the text, add a note about the text, or make the text a clickable hyperlink. The people you’ve shared the note with can see your annotations and make their own. It’s a great way to communicate about the work you’re doing. The video below shows you how to complete each of these tasks.

Be sure to check out these other IT Training Tips Blog posts about Box at IU.

 

 

Software at IU – a quick overview

One of the perks of being an IU student, faculty, or staff member is having access to low-cost and no-cost software. This quick post will give you a rundown of what’s available.

IUware

Let’s start with IUware. Go to the IUware website to download software to your computer. The site will detect what operating system you’re using and take you to the appropriate page. Software is available for PC, Mac, and Linux. Browse software titles by category or use the search box to find what you need. When you’ve found your software, follow the download instructions. You’ll be prompted to enter your IU username and passphrase if you’re not already logged into the Central Authentication System (CAS). Some software requires a product key. You can find keys to products you’ve downloaded by clicking the Keys and Licenses link at the top of the page.

Read the rest of “Software at IU – a quick overview” »

8 Tutorials on Making Selections in Photoshop

Peacock being selected in Photoshop.

Making selections is a skill that all would-be Photoshop experts must master. It’s also something that can be accomplished using many different tools and techniques. This post points you to some tutorials illustrating various ways to make selections in Photoshop. The tool or set of tools you use to make selections depends on the image you’re working with and what you want to accomplish. You can really open up creative avenues by being adept at lots of different selection techniques.  And remember, to get good at anything, you have to practice!

Read the rest of “8 Tutorials on Making Selections in Photoshop” »

IT Training Certificate Series–Updated

Illustration of certificate ribbon.

Earning a certificate from IT Training is a great way to enhance your skills in areas like Microsoft Office, web development, and creating graphics.   Office 2016 is here, so we’ve updated some of the series workshops (note major changes to the Access series). The process is the same. You take a series of related IT Training workshops designed to build your skills in applications or topics in a comprehensive way! After you’ve attended all of the workshops in a series (within a one-year period), you’ll earn your certificate.

We offer certificates in five different areas, so you’re bound to find something to meet your needs.

Office 2016 Productivity (6 workshops)

We’ll introduce you to a variety of Microsoft Office applications and demonstrate ways make them work together. You’ll learn the basic skills for day-to-day office activities from creating a spreadsheet in Excel to creating a PowerPoint presentation. The required workshops are:

1. Outlook 2016: Managing Your Email
2. Outlook 2016: Calendar Essentials
3. Word 2016: The Basics
4. PowerPoint 2016: The Basics
5. Excel 2016: The Basics
6. Access 2016: The Basics

Read the rest of “IT Training Certificate Series–Updated” »

Use Twitter as a Learning Tool

Twitter logo

Depending on how you use it, Twitter can be an incredible time-waster or a useful resource.  Because you’re reading this blog, I assume you’re interested in learning about technology. Why not use Twitter as a tool to further your learning?

In this post, you’ll find a curated list of Twitter accounts that regularly share links to technology news, tips, tricks, and tutorials. Once you’ve chosen some accounts to follow, it’s a good idea to create Twitter lists so you can easily find the type of information that you need. Here are a few tweeters organized by category.  Read the rest of “Use Twitter as a Learning Tool” »

Some Quick Facts about IT Training at IU

FAQ

What is IT Training at IU? Maybe you’ve heard of us, but do you really know what we’re all about? This post answers our most frequently asked questions.

Who can attend IT Training workshops and events?

IU students, faculty, and staff can attend IT Training workshops at no cost. Faculty and staff with official retiree status may also attend free of charge. Non-IU participants can register for workshops for a nominal fee. If you’re not affiliated with IU, you must create a guest account before registering for a workshop. Paying participants receive a 10% discount when registering for all workshops in a Certificate Series at once.

What are my training options?

We offer instructor-led workshops on more than 80 beginning to advanced computing and information technology topics. You can attend in-person at IU Bloomington or IUPUI, or online anywhere you have an Internet connection. If you prefer to learn on your own, you can download our workshop materials or watch webinar and tutorial recordings. You can also take advantage of IU’s partnerships with Pluralsight, Skillsoft, and Microsoft eLearning. Find the complete list of training options here.

Can I earn a certificate from IT Training?

IT Training offers several certificate and certification options including the IT Training Certificate Series. Earning a certificate shows your boss or potential employer that you have taken steps to bolster your technology skills. Enrolling in a certificate series also helps you learn a topic in a comprehensive way.

How do I register for a workshop or Certificate Series?

You can register online for individual workshops, register online for a Certificate Series, or contact us so we can register you for the workshop or series you want.

What can I expect in an IT Training workshop?

In-person workshops happen in our IUB or IUPUI classrooms and range from 50 minutes to three hours long.  As a participant, you’ll be provided with step-by-step materials and a computer. You’ll perform tasks as the instructor demonstrates. If you need help, raise your hand, and the classroom assistant will come and work with you. Don’t hesitate to ask questions! Online workshops operate on the same model. See the Preparing for IT Training online events page for hardware and software requirements and instructions.

What is the difference between an online workshop and webinar?

You’ll use your web browser to participate in both types of presentations, but there are differences. In online workshops, participants complete hands-on exercises. Webinars are usually shorter than workshops and feature demonstration and lecture only. You can ask questions and make comments in both types of presentations.

What accommodation does IT Training provide for those with accessibility issues?

All of our classrooms are accessible to persons using wheelchairs, and we can provide assistance for those with disabilities. Advance notice is important, so contact us if you have a need.

Those are just some of the things you need to know about IT Training. Comment on this post if you have a question that wasn’t addressed here.

 

New to IU? Check out these 5 Knowledge Base Documents

If you need to know something about using technology at IU, the Knowledge Base (KB) should be your first stop. The KB is a searchable repository of information about technology at IU and beyond. Just go to kb.iu.edu and enter a search term, or check the menu for a topic that interests you.

Screenshot of the kb.iu.edu website header, with the caption "Answers to questions about IT at IU."

I’ve put together a list KB documents that should answer some of your technology questions. After all, why ask your roommate when you can consult an authoritative source? Read this post even if you’ve been at IU for years. Technology changes all the time. You need to keep up!

1) At IU, which mobile apps should I use to access IU services?

Just about everyone these days has at least one mobile Internet device, and it’s a safe bet you’ll want to use yours to access IU’s technology services. This document points you to instructions for accessing popular IU services on your smartphone or tablet.

2) About IU Secure wireless

A device not connected to the Internet isn’t very useful. This doc contains links to instructions for connecting your devices to the IU Secure wireless network. It covers Android, BlackBerry, iPhone/iPad, Mac OS X, Linux, Windows, and Windows Phone. There’s also a link to a document about troubleshooting your wireless connection.

3) Printing at IU

Years ago, information scientist, Frederick Wilfrid Lancaster envisioned us living in a “paperless society.” So far, that hasn’t happened. While you should try to avoid wasting paper, sometimes you are required to do some printing. You may be able to turn in your assignments online, but a lot of instructors prefer not to grade papers on their computer screens. This KB document points to information about where to print, how to print, your printing allotment, and more.  Also, check out these IT Training Tips Blog posts about going paperless.

4) How do I download and install software from IUware?

I hope you know about IUware. In case you don’t, IUware is a software distribution service for Indiana University students, faculty, and staff.  It offers a wide variety of software packages at no charge, including products from Adobe and Microsoft. This document is helpful if you’re not quite sure how to download and install your software. It also outlines the differences between installing software on Windows and Mac systems.

5) Best practices for computer security

Keeping your computer secure is vital in this age of data breaches. You’ll want to protect your computer from viruses, and in doing so, you help protect the IU network. This document is packed with advice and best practices for keeping your computer secure. Read it to learn about the principle of least privilege (PoLP), the importance of updating your software, and a lot more.

The KB is amazing! It even has information about transportation on and off campus, using the library catalog, and paying your bursar bill. When in doubt, ask the KB.

Start Building your Tech Skills Now

IT Training Workshops/Webinars August and September

Life at IU is easier when you’re tech savvy. That’s where IT Training comes in. We’re offering workshops and webinars in August and September, so you can start taking advantage of the tech resources available to you before the semester gets too hectic. Here’s what we’ve got in store:

Essential Resources

Tech for Collaboration and Learning

Software at IU

Logistics

You can view the schedule for these workshops and webinars here. Most of them are held online, and a few are in our classrooms at IUB or IUPUI. If you’re ready for more, browse our training schedule by date and plan a semester’s worth of tech learning! And to really fine-tune your skills, enroll in one or more of our certificate series.

Questions?

If you have questions, comment on this post or contact us. Don’t forget to Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Have a great semester!

Some of Our Favorite Technology Podcasts

Podcasts are great for entertainment and learning.

Podcast icon. Headphones over wi-fi symbol.You can listen while driving, biking, exercising, cleaning – really, anytime! If you’re looking for engaging podcasts about technology, check out the list I’ve put together. Topics range from general tech questions to advice about coding, and insights about the role of technology in society. These podcasts make it easy for you to keep up with the ever-changing world of tech. Read the rest of “Some of Our Favorite Technology Podcasts” »

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