Mobile apps to use at IU

Illustration of hand using touch screen to access app icons.

The best way (as a rule) to interact with an online service on your smartphone or tablet is to use an app designed specifically for that service. University Information Technology Services (UITS) has some app recommendations to help you get the best experience when accessing IU systems. Here’s the rundown.

  • As of February 2, 2017, CAS logins for all IU faculty, staff, student employees, retirees, and affiliates require Two-Step Login (Duo). This means you’ll use the Duo Mobile app to access IU systems. Watch this video to see how the app works.
  • I’ll include  Adobe Connect Mobile in this post because IU still uses Connect for conferencing and collaboration. However, the service goes away on August 31, 2017.  Learn about the replacement for Adobe Connect in the next section.
  • Zoom is IU’s new collaboration tool, and IT Training has already adopted it to deliver webinars and online workshops. Zoom’s mobile app is available for iOS and Android. Use it to attend our webinars, but stick to the desktop app for interactive workshops. For best results, enter the event URL in your device’s web browser. You’ll be redirected to the Zoom app where you’ll join the webinar. Learn all about using Zoom in this IT Training webinar.
  • IU’s Unicom service is another option for communicating and collaborating. Read this KB doc to learn how to use Skype for Business/Lync on your mobile device.
  • Access your IU Box files and folders from a mobile device with the Box app. There’s an app for iOS, Android, Windows, and Blackberry. Log in using the Single Sign-on (SSO) option and your IU email address. You’ll be sent to the CAS authentication page.  There’s more about logging in to the app in this IU Knowledge Base (KB) document. You can also access the Box mobile site (box.iu.edu) with your device’s browser, but it offers limited functionality.
  • Canvas in a browser on your device is okay, but the interface can get a little unwieldy. The Canvas mobile app shows a simpler, more manageable view. Some Canvas features are not available in the app. Check this list to see what’s supported in the different operating systems.
  • Google at IU offers a variety of productivity and collaboration tools for use by IU students, faculty, and staff. The service’s mobile apps for Android and iOS include Google Drive, Google Docs, Sheets and Slides, Google Calendar, and more. Find out how to access your Google at IU account from this KB doc.
  • Looking to access IUanyWare while on the go? Download the Citrix Receiver and follow the instructions in the KB for getting connected. You can use IUanyWare with iOS, Android, Blackberry, Windows, and Chrome devices. Learn more about IUanyWare in this KB doc.
  • One.IU is your portal to all things IU. It’s optimized for use in your mobile device’s browser. iOS users can also access One.IU via the IU Mobile app.
  • If you’re on the Bloomington campus at night and don’t feel safe walking home, use the TapRide app to contact the Safety Escort service. Safety Escort is an IU-sponsored organization staffed entirely by IU students. The app is available for iOS and Android devices. You can also call 812-855-SAFE to arrange a pickup.

Be sure to check out Using your mobile device at IU for more tips on getting around online with your smartphone or tablet.

Got a favorite app? Comment and tell us about it.

 

Android vs. Apple: Which one is for you?

Person taking a photo with a Samsung phone.

With devices in the technology market ever-changing, it’s hard to stay up-to-date on what the pros and cons of each phone are. Hopefully, these next few paragraphs will enlighten you on which system is for you.

Let’s start with Android and its advantages over competitors. Android advantages:

  • Great for multitasking; it can run many apps at the same time
  • Will always notify you – there’s always notification on home screen as well as LED blinking indicator
  • Playstore (app store) – thousands upon thousands of apps readily available, even those from third-party developers
  • Apps are also, on average, cheaper than those on iOS systems
  • Multiple phone options from various manufacturers include Samsung, HTC, Motorola, & more – and each have their own style
  • Custom ROM can be installed
  • Use of NFC for multiple things, such as cashless payments or ease of sharing images & more
  • Ease of customization for user interface
  • Prices are wide in range
  • Flexible – pairs well with many devices

Read the rest of “Android vs. Apple: Which one is for you?” »

Rotating Guides in Illustrator

Image of guides and trianglesI was creating triangles in Illustrator recently when I accidentally rotated one of the guidelines in Illustrator. I didn’t even realize this was possible.

If you ever need to rotate guides so you can align an object to the guide, here are the steps:

  1. Create a guideline.
  2. Right click the guideline, point at transform and click rotate.

The Rotate dialog box will appear.

Rotate dialog box in Illustrator CC 2015

  1. Specify the angle you want and click OK.

If you want to see this demonstrated take a look at this video on YouTube:

Guide Tricks in Illustrator

Adjusting Perspective in an Image with Photoshop’s Perspective Crop

Recently I was taking photos of control screens for technology in classrooms around campus. To make these screens easier to view they are often mounted at an angle. This made getting a photo at a 90-degree angle difficult.

The control panel for technology in a classroom

Read the rest of “Adjusting Perspective in an Image with Photoshop’s Perspective Crop” »

Image Trace in Illustrator: turn photos into vector graphics with a few clicks!

Title Image. A bunny under a table sketched using image trace.

One of my favorite features of Illustrator, dating all the way back to Illustrator CS2 (when it was previously called Live Trace), is Image Trace.  Image Trace allows you to take a raster graphic (or bitmap graphic, if you’re more familiar with that term) and turn it into a fully editable vector graphic with just a few clicks.  It’s especially fun to use on photographs that you can then tweak as you like to create interesting works of art or incorporate into other vector graphics like logos.

Read the rest of “Image Trace in Illustrator: turn photos into vector graphics with a few clicks!” »

Web Design Resources

Coding with a warm beverage

Photo by Louis Llerena

It’s winter break. It’s cold outside. It’s the perfect time to snuggle up with a fire, your favorite furry friend, a delightful hot cocoa, a laptop, and learn how to create a web page!

Here are some resources to help get you started.

Accessibility

Color Schemes

File Comparison

Front-end Frameworks

Free Images

Icons

Learning

Web Fonts

Happy coding!

Reinventing the camera, one pair of Spectacles at a time

A social media app officially released in September of 2011 is now branching outside of the social media realm.  Originally called Picaboo, Snapchat is the second largest social networking app after Facebook.  You may or may not have heard of the company’s newest release: Snapchat Spectacles.

A model sporting a pair of Snapchat Spectacles

The spectacles are sunglasses with the addition of tiny cameras in the top two corners.  The camera lenses have a 115-degree curve and record 10-second video clips with the option to record up to three clips consecutively.  Once recording begins, the circular camera creates a ring of lights on its rim to indicate recording is in progress.  The glasses send the 10-second clips you shoot to your smartphone via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi.  The battery in the glasses lasts about a day, while the lights on the rim of the camera act as a battery indicator.  The spectacles can be charged by putting them back in their case.  A fully-charged case can charge the glasses up to four times before needing to charge itself.

Snapchat Spectacles cost $129.99, but can only be purchased from these bright yellow vending machines called Snapbots.  Here’s another catch: Snapbots are only available at a given location for one day before they pack up and move. Luckily, Snap Inc. (as the company calls itself now) has created a website just for the spectacles where you can get hints as to where the next Snapbot pop-up will be.

You may want to check the site every 24 hours to discover a Snapbot and get yourself some Snapchat Spectacles before it is too late.

Sources:

  1. http://www.theverge.com/2016/11/10/13584488/snapchat-snap-inc-spectacles-vending-machine-snapbot-available
  2. http://www.theverge.com/2016/9/23/13039184/snapchat-spectacles-price-release-date-snap-inc
  3. https://techcrunch.com/gallery/a-brief-history-of-snapchat/
  4. https://www.rt.com/usa/367338-snapchats-spectacles-glasses-privacy/

What is IU DeviceNet?

Illustration of media device and remote control.

By now you’ve probably figured out how to connect your smartphone or tablet to the IU Secure wireless network. But what about your gaming console, Roku, or Apple TV? Those devices are not designed to connect to an enterprise network like the one at IU. That’s why UITS created the IU DeviceNet. IU DeviceNet is a wireless network just for media devices and gaming consoles in campus apartments and residence halls. Here’s what you need to know about it.

Appropriate Use

Use DeviceNet for devices that don’t support WPA2/Enterprise encryption, or don’t have a web browser. Some examples are:

  • Gaming systems such as Xbox, PlayStation, Wii, and Wii U
  • Smart TV, DVR, or set-top boxes such as Apple TV, Roku, TiVo, and DVD players
  • Other media devices that require Internet access

Inappropriate Use

IU DeviceNet is an unencrypted network. It won’t ask for your username and passphrase when you connect. Without encryption, any data passed between your device and the wireless access point could be intercepted by others. That’s why you should not connect the following types of devices to this network:

  • Laptop and desktop computers
  • Mobile devices (e.g., smartphones, iPads, and tablets)
  • Any computing device you use to send and receive personal or confidential data
  • Any device that can connect to IU Secure

Incompatible Devices

Some devices and services can’t connect to IU DeviceNet because network routers have access point (AP) isolation enabled. These include Chromecast, Apple Bonjour services, and wireless printers.

Making Purchases

On IU DeviceNet, exercise caution when online stores.  Don’t make transactions using credit card numbers or account passwords over DeviceNet unless you are using a connection encrypted by SSL/TLS or some other web security protocol.

Not sure how to get connected? Follow these instructions. If you need help, contact the UITS Support Center.

Making Annotations in Box Notes

box-icon

Box at IU is more than just a simple, secure way to store your files online. With Box, you can share files and folders and collaborate with classmates and colleagues. One useful tool for collaboration is the Box Note. Box Notes are easy to create, edit, and share, plus they have tools you can use to annotate note content.

When you highlight text in a note you have the option to strike through the text, add a note about the text, or make the text a clickable hyperlink. The people you’ve shared the note with can see your annotations and make their own. It’s a great way to communicate about the work you’re doing. The video below shows you how to complete each of these tasks.

Be sure to check out these other IT Training Tips Blog posts about Box at IU.

 

 

Software at IU – a quick overview

One of the perks of being an IU student, faculty, or staff member is having access to low-cost and no-cost software. This quick post will give you a rundown of what’s available.

IUware

Let’s start with IUware. Go to the IUware website to download software to your computer. The site will detect what operating system you’re using and take you to the appropriate page. Software is available for PC, Mac, and Linux. Browse software titles by category or use the search box to find what you need. When you’ve found your software, follow the download instructions. You’ll be prompted to enter your IU username and passphrase if you’re not already logged into the Central Authentication System (CAS). Some software requires a product key. You can find keys to products you’ve downloaded by clicking the Keys and Licenses link at the top of the page.

Read the rest of “Software at IU – a quick overview” »