5. Creating a Table of Contents Using InDesign Paragraph Styles

ePublishing: Creating a Table of Contents using InDesign Paragraph Styles

This article is part of a series about creating and publishing reflowable electronic publication (EPUB) documents from InDesign files. Reflowable EPUBs are the most popular e-reader format for digital books and magazines, allowing the reader to optimize the content depending on the display device.


For long InDesign documents, it is important to know how to create a table of contents.

There are actually many options for making a table of contents;  EPUB typically uses heading styles for table of contents items. In this article, we will choose the simplest scenario: using paragraph styles. Accordingly, before you generate a table of contents, there are a number of things you have to do.

First, in the Paragraph Styles panel, manage your styles carefully.

  1. Insert headings and subheadings at all key points. Decide which heading style levels should be included in your TOC, and then make sure that these styles are applied to all appropriate headings in your document or book.
  2. In your document, design paragraph styles with the desired look in your TOC.  Include different sizes, indents, tab stops, bolding, and dot leaders if you want them.
  3. You won’t apply these TOC styles directly in your document, so after creating them, either delete the text or apply another style to text you used to create them. The styles will remain in your Paragraph Styles Panel and will be available for you to apply when you separately create and place the TOC from the Menu bar.

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Hurry up with your Canvas migration. It is easy!

Oncourse becomes retired on August 30, 2016. If you haven’t moved your Oncourse data by then, you may be making much more work for yourself than you need to. The Canvas Migration Tool should be used by February 2017. Best feature about the migration tool is that it puts a copy of your migrated data in Canvas, leaving the Oncourse version still available.

I’m an adjunct instructor for SPEA, and wanted to move my own course data from Oncourse into Canvas. Allow me share my own experiences, and the resources that were most valuable to me, as I migrated my own course data. Overall, I found the process to be very well documented, and easy to perform.

Read the rest of “Hurry up with your Canvas migration. It is easy!” »

4. Preparing your InDesign document for EPUB

ePublishing: Preparing your document for EPUB

This article is part of a series about creating and publishing reflowable electronic publication (EPUB) documents from InDesign files. Reflowable EPUBs are the most popular e-reader format for digital books and magazines, allowing the reader to optimize the content depending on the display device.


As you create a reflowable EPUB from your finished InDesign file, the most important thing is to make it navigable and to make sure that pictures and other elements travel along with their accompanying text instead of getting orphaned somewhere that makes no sense.

There are a few ways you need to prepare your InDesign document for EPUB export:

  • First, always use InDesign’s Paragraph, Character, and Object styles. These are the signposts that EPUB export uses to make your document unified, consistent, and navigable.
  • Second, decide on the order of your elements. Keep stories connected, flowing from frame to frame and from page to page.
  • Third, anchor every image to its related text so it moves correspondingly as it reflows. No text wrap can be applied in EPUB, so use not Text Wrap specs in the document you are preparing to export.

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3. About eBooks

ePublishing: About eBooks

This article is part of a series about creating and publishing reflowable electronic publication (EPUB) documents from InDesign files. Reflowable EPUBs are the most popular e-reader format for digital books and magazines, allowing the reader to optimize the content depending on the display device.


An eBook is a digital version of a book. This can be as simple as a PDF format, which can be read on a computer or any of the various ereaders. A big difference between the two is that a PDF-format eBook is not reflowable, as are some other formats such as .EPUB, .AZW, and .MOBI. Of these, the .EPUB format is the most widely accepted eBook standard. Interestingly, the generic definition of “eBook” has evolved to its current definition of any electronic book, whether it is in the PDF format or EPUB format.

What are these eBook formats?

  • .EPUB is readable on most devices, including Kindle Fire. This eBook format is actually a .ZIP archive that contains what is in effect an entire website including HTML files, images, CSS style sheets and other assets. It uses HTML5 so publications can contain video, audio, and interactivity, just like websites in modern browsers. The EPUB format is quickly becoming the publishing industry standard for eBooks because its ability to make the content of a book “reflowable” to whatever device is used.

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kb.iu.edu: The best kept secret at IU

Screenshot of the kb.iu.edu website header, with the caption "Answers to questions about IT at IU."Need help with computing or technology at IU? You can (and should) have the Support Center on speed dial. They’re available 24/7 to answer questions. That means if you’re having trouble submitting an assignment in Canvas at 4am, you should call the Support Center (and not, for example, your instructor!).

Perhaps, though, you (like me) sometimes like to try to solve things on your own. It just so happens that Indiana University has an amazing help repository, and you may not be aware that you can search it directly. It’s name? The Knowledge Base, aka the KB. Read the rest of “kb.iu.edu: The best kept secret at IU” »

Which version of Office are you using?

While it may seem like a very basic question, knowing which version of an Office application you are using is becoming much more important. The core Office applications (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook) are available on multiple platforms now, and an application’s feature set may vary now not just by version, but also by platform.

And the many ways you may be able to get to a particular application may make it seem like finding out would be even more complicated now. Luckily, that isn’t quite true.

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Where did that {Office app} feature go?

As Microsoft Office applications are made available on more and more devices and platforms, some of the things you may actually do with them can vary. Sometimes wildly. It’s a good thing that Microsoft shows what we may be able to use (or not).

For their flagship Office applications, these Microsoft Support site articles provide an overview of feature comparison by application version:

As a bonus, for those of us who may use different operating systems to get our work done, they provide a much more detailed comparison of differences between Excel 2013 and Excel 2016 for Mac.

Web Accessibility Resources

Computer screen and wheelchair symbol illustration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Web content accessibility is crucial for reaching the widest audience possible and is part of Indiana University’s commitment to equity and diversity. IT Training can show you what it means to be accessible, the laws and standards that govern web accessibility, and how to easily address some of the common concerns that prevent individuals with disabilities from using the web effectively. We offer workshops on evaluating and updating your existing content. We can also show you how to create new accessible content for your web presence using a variety of software tools.

Here’s a list of resources you might find helpful after you’ve attended our training sessions.

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2. About Electronic Publications

ePublishing: About Electronic Publications

This article is part of a series about creating and publishing reflowable electronic publication (EPUB) documents from InDesign files. Reflowable EPUBs are the most popular e-reader format for digital books and magazines, allowing the reader to optimize the content depending on the display device.


Now that we have your interest, let’s break down electronic publications in relationship to InDesign.

When you eport your InDesign document to EPUB, you choose whether to make your final output fixed or reflowable. In this article, we’ll discuss the differences and help you to make this design choice.

fixed-layout EPUB has a stationary design which cannot be changed by the reader. It has selectable text that looks much like a PDF and can be uploaded into an iBook store.

Fixed electronic publication layouts can be useful where sophisticated design is important, and where you want to maintain strict layout and font choices.  With this type of publication, there is no reader customization and no zooming in and out at all. You can, however, add interactivity like animations, slide shows, and audio to fixed-layout documents.  Some examples for which you might choose fixed layout might be brochures, children’s books, and photo essays.  At this writing, the fixed format is best for iOS; it is still troublesome for Android, and Kindle (MOBI format) also has some problems with it. In many ways this layout structure is easier to export, but keep in mind that readers who expect to customize their document may find reading it frustrating. Read the rest of “2. About Electronic Publications” »

Adobe CC 2015: Exploring New Features

Adobe CC 2015: Exploring New Features

Curious about what new features were added in the newest release of Adobe Creative Cloud?  Take a look at this webinar that I did along with IT Training staff members Denise Brown and Jen Oakes that focuses on features included in the newest versions of Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Dreamweaver.  We touch on dynamic symbols in Illustrator, artboards in Photoshop, publishing online with InDesign, and using Extract in Dreamweaver – and much more!

View/Listen to Webinar/Podcast recording. View the webinar recording for “Adobe CC 2015: Exploring New Features”. 

Covered in this session:

  • New interface features in Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, and Dreamweaver
  • Introduction to the CC Libraries panel in Illustrator, Photoshop, and Dreamweaver
  • New features of Illustrator, including the Shaper tool, Dynamic Shapes, and Dynamic Symbols
  • New features of Photoshop, including artboards and the ability to customize toolbars
  • New features of InDesign, including the Color Theme tool, Paragraph Shading, and Publish Online
  • New features of Dreamweaver, including Extract, media queries, and Device Preview