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Archive for the 'Photoshop' Category

The best way to save your images

One of the biggest space fillers on your computer right now is probably images and movies, especially if you’re a designer. Digital images take up a lot of space all over the place–in our emails, computer memory, webpages, etc. It’s such a pain when you don’t have any more space on your devices, and absolutely everyone hates when those pesky large files take FOREVER to load. When working with digital image files there are certain file types that work better depending on what you are doing.

Small info graphic stating "Know your file types: When to use .gif, .jpeg, .png"  Read the rest of “The best way to save your images” »

Try out and save effects with Photoshop Layer Comps

You can save different versions of an image using the Layer Comps panel, and then choose one later. You may want to try on effects by enabling visibility, position, and appearance of specific layers of that image. A common example would be  where you want three or more versions of the same image; for example, one version may be black and white, one tinted, and one in full color.

image showing visibility of two layers in the Photoshop Layer Comps panel

image showing visibility of two other layers in the Photoshop Layer Comps panel  image showing visibility of two layers in the Photoshop Layer Comps panel

With Photoshop Layer Comps you don’t have to save three different images. Instead, as long as you save your changes in layers, you can save and compare each of these adjustments in the same image.

The beauty of Layer Comps is that when you save your document as a Photoshop document, you can always return to all your settings by returning to each of your saved Layer Comps. You may close the document and still return to all your settings later when you open the document. Layer Comps will remember some, but not all, of your modifications.

To start using Layer Comps, show the Layer Comps panel: from the Photoshop menu, choose Window -> Layer Comps.

With the Layer Comps panel in view, to save specific layer combinations, simply show and hide the layers you want in the Layers panel. With each variation, click the Create New Layer Comp button  Screen Shot 2015-01-07 at 5.27.19 PM in the Layer Comps panel. The visibility of the layers will be saved just as you specified. Name each Layer Comp so you will know at a glance which set of layers will be viewed when you select them later.

Use Photoshop clipping layers to create overlays and cameos

image_inset

In Photoshop, a clipping layer is a layer whose pixel or vector content acts as a mask for one or more layers above it. Where either pixel or vector content exists on the clipping layer, you can use the shape of the content to reveal what is on the layer above, while its transparent areas reveal what is on the layer below.

The result of the clipping action is that you don’t actually see the content of the clipping area; you are just using its shape like you would a cookie-cutter. One of the things you will do most with clipping layers is to make type or a shape look like it’s filled with a photo. You can do this over a transparent background, or over another image.

Here, we started with a simple river landscape, for which we would like to add an inset of eagles:

River image in Photoshop. One layer only at this point.

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Use a Photoshop clipping layer to confine an adjustment to a specific layer

Sometimes in Photoshop you need to apply an adjustment layer to only the layer directly beneath. In the example below, a few shots were taken from a mobile phone with the intention to fit them together later into a panorama using Photoshop. In this case, because of changing lighting conditions between shots, the topmost layer happens to be darker:

layeredTemple1

By applying an adjustment layer to it, you can now see that the entire scene is lightened:

layeredTemple2

This is not the effect we want. What we need to do is brighten only the top layer, leaving the rest untouched.

Read the rest of “Use a Photoshop clipping layer to confine an adjustment to a specific layer” »

Quick way to create background color in Photoshop

Ever want to put a color in the background layer of you Photoshop file? It is so simple.
1. Click on the foreground color in the toolbox.

Graphic of Photoshop's foreground and background tool on the toolbox

 

 

 

 

2. Choose the color of the background desired by clicking in the large area on the menu. That color will appear under the word new:

Color Picker menu in Photoshop

 

3. Click OK in the menu.
4. Hold down the Alt key (Option on a Mac) and hit the Backspace key.
5. The background is filled with that color.
6. If the background color on the toolbox is what you prefer, hold down the Control key (Command on the Mac) and hit the Backspace key.

Just saved you lots of time, right?

Delve into Photoshop’s tools with this collection of resources

Adobe Photoshop is a complex piece of software to tackle. If your goal is to become a Photoshop expert, plan on spending several years working at it. If you want to learn as little as you can to make it useful, I suggest you take our Photoshop CS6: The Basics workshop.  If and when you’re ready to go further, try the other workshops and webinars  that we offer.

Learning how to use Photoshop requires a hands-on approach, and once you’ve exhausted all of IT Training’s offerings, you’ll need to seek other learning resources. Luckily for you, the Internet is overflowing with free Photoshop tutorials. In this post, I share a few of them with you.

Photoshop is all about the tools. There are probably hundreds of them, and if you don’t know which tool to use for which task, you won’t be able to accomplish very much. That’s why I searched the Web for tutorials that really focus on Photoshop’s tools. It seems to me that learning what each tool can do is like learning the alphabet. Once you have the letters, you can build words, and then sentences, then paragraphs; you get the idea.

So without further ado, here are six tool-focused Photoshop tutorials. Click titles to view the tutorials.

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it2go Episode 67 – Fall Webinars

On this week’s episode, we’re talking about some of the new upcoming webinars happening early this fall. Check it out!

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My Photoshop Process Videos

I thought I would share two process videos for two different Photoshop projects that I made. The total time for both of them were about 10 hours each. If you are curious on how I made any of the effects, please leave a comment!

Photoshop CS6 Cracked Effects Tutorial

I created the image below using various methods in Photoshop CS6. There are many different effects and techniques used throughout the whole image. However, the main thing I would like to focus on is the cracked effect on the center of her body.

resize

The video goes into detail about how I created the cracks seen throughout her skin. It explains many different techniques that Photoshop has to offer in order to create this effect. Hopefully you will learn something new by watching it!

Click here to download all the resources.

Adobe CS Quick Tip: Customized Keyboard Shortcuts

I just recently downloaded a new app for my iPad called Actions, so I’ve been working on configuring it for the applications that I use often. Throughout this process, I’ve been searching applications for keyboard shortcuts for commands and buttons that I use often so I can decide whether or not I want to map it to an Actions button. While setting up my Dreamweaver shortcuts, I realized that a lot of the tools I use already have shortcuts, but some of them (like Save All) don’t.

After a little bit of digging, I discovered that Adobe CS applications allow you to customize the keyboard shortcuts that come standard in the application. I thought I would pass along the info to you all as well. I checked out Dreamweaver, InDesign, Photoshop, Fireworks, and Illustrator and the following will work for all of them.

To edit the keyboard shortcuts in an Adobe application, in the Menu Bar, click Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts…. You’ll see the following dialog box:

Dreamweaver Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box.

Dreamweaver Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box.

From here, you simply find the command you want to add or change a shortcut for in the Commands section, then click in the Press Key text box, press the keyboard shortcut you want to assign, then click Change. If you’re adding your first shortcut, you’ll have to save a copy of the default keyboard set, but the application will warn you if needed.

That’s all there is to it. If you are curious, here’s what I was working on setting up using Actions for Dreamweaver:

Actions Dreamweaver Shortcuts

My Actions setup for Dreamweaver.

Now that I’ve got that configured, I’ll be exploring how Actions can help my productivity in other applications. I expect I’ll write a post about Actions in the near future, so stay tuned.

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