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Archive for the 'Microsoft' Category

“We need to remove some older apps” error during Office 2016 installation

So you’re very keen to install and use the new Office 2016 suite on your PC? Please be certain to take a few moments before you do that, so you won’t unexpectedly see the error “We need to remove some older apps”:
Subtle error message prompting removal of Office 2013 stand-alone apps

Are you running any of the following standalone Office 2013 applications?
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Happy Birthday Windows 95!

While the Microsoft spotlight is squarely on Windows 10 and its release, let’s pause for a moment and wish Windows 95 a happy 20th birthday! While many of us cannot live without the today, Windows 95 was the first Microsoft operating system to use the task bar and start menu. If you’ve got an hour, check out this Windows 95 introduction, starring Jennifer Aniston and Matthew Perry.

Things have come a long way in the last 20 years!

Presenting Data like a Pro: Excel

Title image that is tinted in purple and has three people in a meetings

So, you’ve put together some super interesting and wickedly compelling data in Excel that you want to share with your colleagues. While the data might be 100% clear to you, sometimes lots of numbers  can seem a little obscure to an outside party. What do you do in order to present the data and get the maximum impact you are hoping for?

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Access vs. Excel

Title image that says "Excel vs. Access" and shows the excel and access logos

Excel and Access are both very powerful applications. They are each special in their own way, however; there comes a time when the things you are trying to do can be completed in either work space. So, what do you choose? Neither of these applications are necessarily better than one another, but their features might be better suited for one action versus another action.

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Switch Your Mouse to the Left Side

Mouse iconAs a rule, a user’s mouse hand is determined by the hand with which they write. Right-handed users position the mouse to the right of the keyboard while left-handed users might choose to position the mouse to the left of the keyboard. Some left-handed users choose to acclimate themselves to the mouse on the right side (especially if they share their computer with a right-handed user); others that are right-handed choose to switch to using their left hand to alleviate repetitive stress injuries in their right hand or wrist.

If you decide to switch your mouse to the left, you may want to consider altering the mouse button assignments – some people just find it more natural to have the “left” click action, or primary mouse button, always controlled by the index finger, and the “right” click action, or secondary mouse button, controlled by the middle finger.

If you do want to reverse the function of the mouse buttons, the switch is quite easy in Windows 8.1. Read the rest of “Switch Your Mouse to the Left Side” »

Sharing an Outlook Calendar

A title image displaying the outlook logo and words that say "Sharing an outlook calendar"

Does someone in your office need to see your calendar? Are you sharing you calendar with someone while you’re away? Indiana University’s Outlook accounts are set by default to allow sharing of only your Free/Busy time, so you can view anyone’s calendar this way as long as they haven’t already changed their settings. But what do you do if you want to share more details? Read the rest of “Sharing an Outlook Calendar” »

Real-time Collaborative Editing in Word, Excel and PowerPoint

Go Paperless! IT Training can help!


This is part of a series of articles that will appear over the next few months as part of the Go Paperless initiative at Indiana University.

When multiple individuals provide their separate contributions to a single document, this is termed as collaborative editing. Having the ability to allow more than one person to update the same document is often as essential as it is advantageous. Until recently, collaborative editing of Word, Excel or PowerPoint files had a major restriction in that only one person could work on a single file at a time; otherwise, it was necessary to keep multiple versions of the file and reconcile them all into a single file. This restriction can be a bottleneck since only one person may edit the file at a time, additional effort is needed for version control and coordination between contributors, and reconciling between multiple files requires additional effort and increases the risk for missed updates.

Collaborative editing technology, however, has matured significantly over the past few years through the use of cloud storage services. By leveraging cloud technologies, collaborators now have access to a number of tools that help streamline collaborative editing. Of specific interest to Office users, synchronous or real-time collaborative editing is now possible, which allows several people to work on a Word, Excel, or PowerPoint file at the same time. Let’s take a brief look at this real-time collaborative editing provided by Google and Microsoft. Before we start, please note that Google Drive and Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud storage services are not supported by IU and are not suitable for storing or sharing institutional data. However, this information may be of use for personal projects.

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Animated emoticons take over Lync

Recently, my copy of Lync 2013 updated itself into something called Skype for Business. Many of the functions I use with Lync have remained exactly the same, but there are some notable differences. For one, in my task bar, my Lync icon now appears with the Skype S:

Skype for Business icon

Interestingly, the program itself still says “Microsoft Lync (Lync)” at the top. (Don’t ask me why they feel the need to repeat it.) If you’d like to learn more about the changes, you can visit the Discover Skype for Business site here.

The change I find most distracting, however, is the addition of the Skype emoticons. Or perhaps I should call them emoji? (I’ve consulted this article from the Guardian to try to understand how to use the terms, but I’m still not quite sure:

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Creating a Research Poster: A Learning Path

Learning paths road sign.I need to assemble a research poster – how do I get started, and what programs can I use to make a poster?  And how do I make graphs to display my data?

With programs like InDesign, Illustrator, and Microsoft Publisher, with a little help from Microsoft Excel, you can create an eye-catching poster to showcase your research project.  Illustrator and Excel can be used to create attractive graphs to display any data you wish to share, and you can pull everything together in InDesign or Publisher and lay out the contents of your poster.  Before you start building your poster, there are a few steps you can take to help get things rolling.

Photograph of a pad of paper, with a rough design for a poster sketched out on it.Having a general idea of how your poster will look will help you get started – think about how things will be laid out on the page, what colors you’ll be using, and what fonts you’ll be using for your poster.  A rough sketch of what you want your poster to look like when it’s finished may be helpful, and you can use that as a road map of where things should end up on your poster.  Make notes about the colors you might want to use, and fonts you might want to use for headings and body text – when you start building your poster, you’ll have everything you need planned out already and can focus on laying things out.  You’ll also want to make sure to collect any images you want to include, the data you want to present, and the text of your poster in one location before you start working.  Once you have those items together, the following learning paths will help you create your poster.

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Looking for Group – edit the size of objects in PowerPoint

I’m trying to compare two pictures of the same area taken at two different times – but not being a great photographer, I was not standing in exactly the same spot both times, so I’m having to crop and zoom like crazy to get the before and after shots to match.

Let’s look at an example using two shots (one taken by Joe Ravi, CC-BY-SA 3.0; the other from of the Jefferson Memorial in my home town, Washington, D.C. In this case I have both pictures in a PowerPoint slide, side by side:

Screenshot of two pictures of different sizes, side-by-side, of the Jefferson Memorial.Once I get them sized relatively, though, I might realize that I want them both to be bigger on the canvas. Fine, except if I’ve finally sized them both perfectly compared to each other, and I try to make one larger, I’ll have to make all of those minute adjustments all over again… or I would, if I didn’t make use of the group tool!

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