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Archive for the 'InDesign' Category

Adobe Creative Cloud 2015 is Here!

The Adobe Creative Cloud 2015 What's New website. Click to go!

The day we have all been waiting for has arrived!

 

Yesterday, Adobe started rolling out their updated version of Creative Cloud, Adobe CC 2015. This update brings with it many enhancements for the core Adobe applications. If you’re already using Creative Cloud, simply launch the Creative Cloud application (from the system tray on Windows or the notifications area on Mac) and you should be able to update any or all of the applications.

Some of my favorite updates include:

  • Artboards in Photoshop
  • Auto-save in Illustrator
  • Bootstrap and Emmet integration in Dreamweaver
  • Faster zooming and scrolling in InDesign

You can read more about the update by visiting the following resources on Adobe’s website:

If you’d rather watch a video, you can watch Lynda.com videos from the following playlist:

Over the next several months, IT Training staff will be busy updating our in person and online workshop materials to teach the Adobe CC 2015 applications. Check back in the fall semester to sign up for our course offerings!

Creating a Research Poster: A Learning Path

Learning paths road sign.I need to assemble a research poster – how do I get started, and what programs can I use to make a poster?  And how do I make graphs to display my data?

With programs like InDesign, Illustrator, and Microsoft Publisher, with a little help from Microsoft Excel, you can create an eye-catching poster to showcase your research project.  Illustrator and Excel can be used to create attractive graphs to display any data you wish to share, and you can pull everything together in InDesign or Publisher and lay out the contents of your poster.  Before you start building your poster, there are a few steps you can take to help get things rolling.

Photograph of a pad of paper, with a rough design for a poster sketched out on it.Having a general idea of how your poster will look will help you get started – think about how things will be laid out on the page, what colors you’ll be using, and what fonts you’ll be using for your poster.  A rough sketch of what you want your poster to look like when it’s finished may be helpful, and you can use that as a road map of where things should end up on your poster.  Make notes about the colors you might want to use, and fonts you might want to use for headings and body text – when you start building your poster, you’ll have everything you need planned out already and can focus on laying things out.  You’ll also want to make sure to collect any images you want to include, the data you want to present, and the text of your poster in one location before you start working.  Once you have those items together, the following learning paths will help you create your poster.

Read the rest of “Creating a Research Poster: A Learning Path” »

Adobe CS6 Interface Overview

If you’re new to the Adobe Creative Suite, trying to figure out what the different parts of the programs do can be a daunting task.  This video helps take some of the mystery out of Adobe CS6, however, and introduces you to the interfaces for Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and Dreamweaver.

Please note: For the best viewing experience, please use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.

Creating Logos in Illustrator and Using Them in InDesign

In a recent workshop, I was asked why logos created in Illustrator look strange when the logo is resized inside InDesign. Here is a possible answer to this problem.

Let’s begin inside Illustrator and create our logo.
spirals

Read the rest of “Creating Logos in Illustrator and Using Them in InDesign” »

Convert a frame’s shape in InDesign

If you want to try on shapes of image frames in InDesign, you don’t have to keep re-drawing frames and re-placing images.

From InDesign’s menu bar, choose Object>Convert Shape and choose the shape of your choice.

InDesign will convert your existing shape into the one you want.

image of flower stand in square frame

image of flower stand in elliptical frame

Spread one image through multiple shapes in InDesign

In Indesign, you can place a single image into several frames for a visual effect.

one image spread throughout 18 frames in InDesign

Here’s how:

Read the rest of “Spread one image through multiple shapes in InDesign” »

What font is that?

Have you ever seen a great looking font on a website or piece of printed material that you’d love to use in your next project? You’d love to use it, but you don’t know what it is. Don’t worry. There are free tools on the  Internet to help you find that font.

letters

1. My Fonts – WhatTheFont http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/

On WhatTheFont, you can upload an image or type in the url of an online image. Make sure the image is simple. Images that are too complex cannot be interpreted by WhatTheFont.

2. Identifont –  http://www.identifont.com/

Identifont asks questions to help you identify the font you’re interested in. If you have an idea of the font’s name, but don’t quite know how to spell it, you  can type what you think it is and let Identifont  figure out what you mean. You can find a font that is similar to one who’s name you know, or find one  that contains a specific symbol or picture. If you know the name of a font designer, you can find that person’s fonts.

 3. Linotype Font Finder – http://www.linotype.com/fontidentifier.html

Enter a few letters and then answer a series of questions to help you recognize the font. This is a good one for people who are interested in the characteristics that make up a font.

 4. Fount – http://fount.artequalswork.com/

Fount provides a browser button so you can identify fonts on any website.

There are more of these tools out there. Just do a search using the terms “font identifier” to find one (or more) that works for you.

Learn more about using fonts in your design projects in our InDesign workshops, and in Page Design & Layout Basics.

 

it2go – Episode 63 – New On The Blog

On this week’s episode, we’re discussing what’s new on the blog.

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Adobe CS Quick Tip: Customized Keyboard Shortcuts

I just recently downloaded a new app for my iPad called Actions, so I’ve been working on configuring it for the applications that I use often. Throughout this process, I’ve been searching applications for keyboard shortcuts for commands and buttons that I use often so I can decide whether or not I want to map it to an Actions button. While setting up my Dreamweaver shortcuts, I realized that a lot of the tools I use already have shortcuts, but some of them (like Save All) don’t.

After a little bit of digging, I discovered that Adobe CS applications allow you to customize the keyboard shortcuts that come standard in the application. I thought I would pass along the info to you all as well. I checked out Dreamweaver, InDesign, Photoshop, Fireworks, and Illustrator and the following will work for all of them.

To edit the keyboard shortcuts in an Adobe application, in the Menu Bar, click Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts…. You’ll see the following dialog box:

Dreamweaver Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box.

Dreamweaver Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box.

From here, you simply find the command you want to add or change a shortcut for in the Commands section, then click in the Press Key text box, press the keyboard shortcut you want to assign, then click Change. If you’re adding your first shortcut, you’ll have to save a copy of the default keyboard set, but the application will warn you if needed.

That’s all there is to it. If you are curious, here’s what I was working on setting up using Actions for Dreamweaver:

Actions Dreamweaver Shortcuts

My Actions setup for Dreamweaver.

Now that I’ve got that configured, I’ll be exploring how Actions can help my productivity in other applications. I expect I’ll write a post about Actions in the near future, so stay tuned.

Creating and Using Templates with InDesign, Part 3: Pages and Saving

In the last article, Creating and Using Templates in InDesign Part 2, we talked about creating paragraph styles and footers. In this final part, we’ll cover adding an additional page size, adding pages to our file size and then saving our file in the template format.

When dealing with a magazine, you have to consider thickness of the finished product. This basically means that the cover of the magazine will be slightly wider than the inner pages to make up for the thickness of the contained pages. Since the page we already designed is 8.5” by 11” and it contains all of our ad guidelines, we know this is the size for our inner pages. Let’s define it as that by changing the name in the Pages Panel.

To change the name of the Master Page, in the Pages Panel, choose Master Options for “A-Master.”

Mast Page Options

 

Read the rest of “Creating and Using Templates with InDesign, Part 3: Pages and Saving” »

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