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Archive for the 'Adobe' Category

Creating a Research Poster: A Learning Path

Learning paths road sign.I need to assemble a research poster – how do I get started, and what programs can I use to make a poster?  And how do I make graphs to display my data?

With programs like InDesign, Illustrator, and Microsoft Publisher, with a little help from Microsoft Excel, you can create an eye-catching poster to showcase your research project.  Illustrator and Excel can be used to create attractive graphs to display any data you wish to share, and you can pull everything together in InDesign or Publisher and lay out the contents of your poster.  Before you start building your poster, there are a few steps you can take to help get things rolling.

Photograph of a pad of paper, with a rough design for a poster sketched out on it.Having a general idea of how your poster will look will help you get started – think about how things will be laid out on the page, what colors you’ll be using, and what fonts you’ll be using for your poster.  A rough sketch of what you want your poster to look like when it’s finished may be helpful, and you can use that as a road map of where things should end up on your poster.  Make notes about the colors you might want to use, and fonts you might want to use for headings and body text – when you start building your poster, you’ll have everything you need planned out already and can focus on laying things out.  You’ll also want to make sure to collect any images you want to include, the data you want to present, and the text of your poster in one location before you start working.  Once you have those items together, the following learning paths will help you create your poster.

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Adobe CS6 Interface Overview

If you’re new to the Adobe Creative Suite, trying to figure out what the different parts of the programs do can be a daunting task.  This video helps take some of the mystery out of Adobe CS6, however, and introduces you to the interfaces for Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and Dreamweaver.

Please note: For the best viewing experience, please use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.

Creating a PDF Form in Adobe Acrobat

Go Paperless! IT Training can help!

This is part of a series of articles that will appear over the next few months as part of the Go Paperless initiative at Indiana University.

Does your department make use of forms that people need to fill out and return to you?  If so, one way to reduce the amount of paper used by printing out all those forms is to create a PDF form in Adobe Acrobat.  Not only does it help reduce the amount of paper your office uses, but there are also other benefits to making use of PDF Forms.  In this article, I’ll show you how to create a simple PDF form using Microsoft Word and Adobe Acrobat XI.

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Muse: Creating a Website without Coding

Screenshot of a website created in Adobe Muse.Creating websites can be a daunting task – especially if you don’t have much experience with HTML code.  If you’re more of a graphic designer than a web designer, and want to create attractive websites without needing to learn how to code, Adobe Muse can help!  Muse is part of the Adobe Creative Cloud suite of software, and IT Training’s recent webinar, Muse: Creating a Website without Coding, gives a quick overview of the program.

In the webinar, we covered the following topics:

  • Navigating the Muse interface
  • Creating a new site
  • Working with master pages to create templates for a site
  • Incorporating text and graphics into a page
  • Using widgets to add navigation and slideshows

View/Listen to Webinar/Podcast recording. Watch the recording of Muse: Creating a Website Without Coding!

If you’ve worked with Adobe’s design programs, like Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign, Muse provides familiar tools and a similar interface to Adobe’s design programs, and graphic designers will feel right at home designing websites in Muse.  We couldn’t cover everything that Muse has to offer in our webinar – is there anything you’re interested in learning how to do in Muse?  Drop us a line in the comments!

Adobe Connect for Online Presentations

Baby using a computerWhen it comes to Adobe Connect at IU, whether you’re starting at a beginner level (like the subject in the photo on the left) or you’re an advanced user, our recent webinar “Adobe Connect for Online Presentations” likely has some takeaways you can use.

View webinar recording. View the webinar recording for “Adobe Connect for Online Presentations.”

In this webinar, we covered:

  • Planning for a successful event
  • Creating an Adobe Connect meeting
  • Getting familiar with the Adobe Connect interface
  • Using pods and layouts effectively to strengthen your presentation
  • Managing events and content on connect.iu.edu

These links were shared during the webinar for additional information:

If you liked this webinar, you might also be interested in:

PowerPoint 2013: The Basics 
FEBRUARY 19
5:30 – 9:00
IUPUI ICTC IT121
PowerPoint 2013: Setting Up a Slide Show with Audio & Video (Webinar)
MARCH 5
5:30 – 7:30
Online

Find and register for these events.

Drop us a line in the comments! What additional questions do you have after watching the recording? What do you wish was covered that we didn’t discuss?

 

How to organize your files

files_header

I’m sure this isn’t going to be the most advanced tip you have ever came across, but this new way of organization changed the way I manage my files. Today I’m going to show you how you can Photoshop, paint, PowerPoint, or whatever your favorite software is for creating simple block graphics in order to make your very own custom background.

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Preparing Graphics for the Web

Try out and save effects with Photoshop Layer Comps

You can save different versions of an image using the Layer Comps panel, and then choose one later. You may want to try on effects by enabling visibility, position, and appearance of specific layers of that image. A common example would be  where you want three or more versions of the same image; for example, one version may be black and white, one tinted, and one in full color.

image showing visibility of two layers in the Photoshop Layer Comps panel

image showing visibility of two other layers in the Photoshop Layer Comps panel  image showing visibility of two layers in the Photoshop Layer Comps panel

With Photoshop Layer Comps you don’t have to save three different images. Instead, as long as you save your changes in layers, you can save and compare each of these adjustments in the same image.

The beauty of Layer Comps is that when you save your document as a Photoshop document, you can always return to all your settings by returning to each of your saved Layer Comps. You may close the document and still return to all your settings later when you open the document. Layer Comps will remember some, but not all, of your modifications.

To start using Layer Comps, show the Layer Comps panel: from the Photoshop menu, choose Window -> Layer Comps.

With the Layer Comps panel in view, to save specific layer combinations, simply show and hide the layers you want in the Layers panel. With each variation, click the Create New Layer Comp button  Screen Shot 2015-01-07 at 5.27.19 PM in the Layer Comps panel. The visibility of the layers will be saved just as you specified. Name each Layer Comp so you will know at a glance which set of layers will be viewed when you select them later.

Convert a frame’s shape in InDesign

If you want to try on shapes of image frames in InDesign, you don’t have to keep re-drawing frames and re-placing images.

From InDesign’s menu bar, choose Object>Convert Shape and choose the shape of your choice.

InDesign will convert your existing shape into the one you want.

image of flower stand in square frame

image of flower stand in elliptical frame

Spread one image through multiple shapes in InDesign

In Indesign, you can place a single image into several frames for a visual effect.

one image spread throughout 18 frames in InDesign

Here’s how:

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