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Web Accessibility Resources

Computer screen and wheelchair symbol illustration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Web content accessibility is crucial for reaching the widest audience possible and is part of Indiana University’s commitment to equity and diversity. IT Training can show you what it means to be accessible, the laws and standards that govern web accessibility, and how to easily address some of the common concerns that prevent individuals with disabilities from using the web effectively. We offer workshops on evaluating and updating your existing content. We can also show you how to create new accessible content for your web presence using a variety of software tools.

Here’s a list of resources you might find helpful after you’ve attended our training sessions.

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Earn a Certificate from IT Training

Illustration of ribbon on certificate.

Earning a certificate from IT Training is a great way to enhance your skills in areas like Microsoft Office, web development, and creating graphics.  You’ll take a series of related IT Training workshops designed to build your skills in applications or topics in a comprehensive way! After you’ve attended all of the workshops in a series (within a one-year period), you’ll earn your certificate.

We offer certificates in six different areas, so you’re bound to find something to meet your needs.

Office 2013 Productivity (6 workshops)

We’ll introduce you to a variety of Microsoft Office applications and demonstrate ways make them work together. You’ll learn the basic skills for day-to-day office activities from creating a spreadsheet in Excel to creating a PowerPoint presentation. The required workshops are:

1. Outlook 2013: Calendar Essentials
2. Outlook 2013: Managing Your Email
3. Word 2013: The Essentials
4. PowerPoint 2013: The Basics
5. Excel 2013: The Basics
6. Access 2013: The Basics

Read the rest of “Earn a Certificate from IT Training” »

Photoshop Books at IU Libraries

Students walk in front of University Library as they go to classes Tuesday, January 8, 2013.

Students walk in front of University Library as they go to classes Tuesday, January 8, 2013.

Photoshop, in my opinion, is one of the greatest things since sliced bread. It’s a powerful piece of software, but you can’t fully realize that power until you learn how to use it. To help you along, I’ve put together a list of Adobe Photoshop related books you can get from an IU Library. Remember, you can use Interlibrary Loan to get books that are not housed on your campus. I found the books by doing a simple search on the term “Photoshop’ in IUCAT.

I limited the results to books falling under the Subject “Adobe Photoshop” that were published within the last three years. I got 15 books, but this list includes only the titles I found to be most relevant to the IU community.

Here’s the list:

And don’t forget to take advantage of your access to no-cost workshops from IU IT Training.

You can find our Photoshop offerings here.

 

Tech Tools for Better Writing

Do you like to write or do you hate it? When your instructor assigns a paper do you cheer or do you groan? Well, probably very few students cheer at the thought of writing an academic paper. If you’re one of those few, you have my respect and admiration. This post is for the less enthusiastic among us.

Writing comes easily to some people. I’ve always felt I had a knack for it, but I’ve come to realize that my grammar skills are a bit lacking. I was okay with the basics, but there were some rules that I just didn’t know or fully understand. If I wanted to be a better writer, I had to get better at grammar. Naturally, I turned to the Internet for help.

Of course, there is more to writing than grammar. When you write, you have to consider your: topic, audience, medium, etc. For now, I’ll focus on Internet resources for getting help with the mechanics of writing.

GRAMMARLY

Paste your text into the Grammarly web app and get a run-down of your wiring mistakes. You can also download the Grammarly plugin for MS Word to get better grammar and spell check results than you would with Word’s native checker. Grammarly has a free plan, but serious users will want to pay for the full product. There are other checkers out there, but I haven’t found anything better than this. Here’s a video demo of Grammarly in Word

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Get to know Canvas

IU Canvas Login Screen

IU’s online learning environment, Oncourse, is on its way out. Canvas is already here!

First, if you’ve used Oncourse in the past and have files stored in the Resources area, read this IU Knowledge Base document to find out how to move them. Your next step is learning how to use Canvas. In this post, I’ll point you to some resources that will help you do just that!

Read the rest of “Get to know Canvas” »

Get the Most out of Word 2013

Microsoft Word Title Image

You can probably sit down, open Word 2013, and use it fairly proficiently. But why not bump up your skills from proficient to pretty awesome? Okay, pretty awesome might sound like too exciting a description when talking about word processing skills, but I’ve got to tell you that some of the things you can do in Word are actually pretty awesome. You can figure out how to do neat stuff in Word on your own by trial and error, using the help button, looking up tutorials on the Internet, or asking your friends. But wouldn’t it be easier to pop into an IT Training workshop or webinar and have a professional show you some of the software’s best secrets? If you like that idea, read on to find out what you can learn in our Word workshops.

Read the rest of “Get the Most out of Word 2013” »

Creating a Basic Syllabus in Canvas

Go Paperless! IT Training can help!

This is part of a series of articles that will appear over the next few months as part of the Go Paperless initiative at Indiana University.

A course syllabus is like a road map. It shows your students what to expect in the course and what is expected of them. In the courses I’ve taken at IU, I’ve found that instructors deliver syllabi in different ways. In the days of Oncourse, some would type syllabus content into the Syllabus tool. Others would link to a separate Web page or Word document.  I found it annoying when I had to leave Oncourse to view the syllabus. When Canvas came along, I had an instructor who used the Oncourse Syllabus tool and then Canvas for everything else. Some instructors like to print copies of the syllabus to hand out on the first day of class. That’s okay, but if they don’t plan to go over what’s on the syllabus that day, they may have wasted a lot of paper. As an instructor, you can do what works best for you. I’m writing this post to show you how to create your syllabus in Canvas.

For this demonstration, I’ll pretend I’m teaching a Dance History 101 course. (I have a M.F.A. in dance, so I know a few things.) Read the rest of “Creating a Basic Syllabus in Canvas” »

Uploading Assignments in Canvas at IU

Go Paperless! IT Training can help!

This is part of a series of articles that will appear over the next few months as part of the Go Paperless initiative at Indiana University.

I’m a grad student, and I love it when my instructors ask for assignments to be turned in electronically. It saves paper, and it alleviates the hassle of printing.  IU is transitioning from Oncourse to Canvas, but don’t worry, you’ll still be able to turn in your assignments online. If you’ve uploaded assignments in Oncourse you’ll find that uploading in Canvas  works basically the same way. I’ve outlined the steps for uploading an assignment below, and I’ve created a short video so you can see the steps in action.

Read the rest of “Uploading Assignments in Canvas at IU” »

Pluralsight-It’s here through December!

The spring semester pilot program for Pluralsight has been extended through the end of December 2014! Pluralsight recently acquired Digital Tutors, a leading provider of video-based courses on design topics such as video editing, multimedia, 3D rendering, Adobe applications and much more. All pilot participants can access Digital Tutors training at no charge for the duration of the pilot!

 

To learn more about this pilot, visit our Pluralsight page. If you have questions about this service, please contact us at itpilot@iu.edu.

Screenshot from Pluralsight video.

Screenshot from Pluralsight video.

What font is that?

Have you ever seen a great looking font on a website or piece of printed material that you’d love to use in your next project? You’d love to use it, but you don’t know what it is. Don’t worry. There are free tools on the  Internet to help you find that font.

letters

1. My Fonts – WhatTheFont http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/

On WhatTheFont, you can upload an image or type in the url of an online image. Make sure the image is simple. Images that are too complex cannot be interpreted by WhatTheFont.

2. Identifont –  http://www.identifont.com/

Identifont asks questions to help you identify the font you’re interested in. If you have an idea of the font’s name, but don’t quite know how to spell it, you  can type what you think it is and let Identifont  figure out what you mean. You can find a font that is similar to one who’s name you know, or find one  that contains a specific symbol or picture. If you know the name of a font designer, you can find that person’s fonts.

 3. Linotype Font Finder – http://www.linotype.com/fontidentifier.html

Enter a few letters and then answer a series of questions to help you recognize the font. This is a good one for people who are interested in the characteristics that make up a font.

 4. Fount – http://fount.artequalswork.com/

Fount provides a browser button so you can identify fonts on any website.

There are more of these tools out there. Just do a search using the terms “font identifier” to find one (or more) that works for you.

Learn more about using fonts in your design projects in our InDesign workshops, and in Page Design & Layout Basics.

 

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